PRESS RELEASE 

If there’s one aspect guaranteed to get tongues wagging over the festive duration it is the undermining of and perceived looming threats to liked Christmas traditions.

Debates about dining times, the festive unfold, video games and cracker jokes, the King’s speech, and now…gin in an “old school” cocktail?

That’s the debatable notion of artisan gin professional Golden Road Gin, who’s recommended a twist on the all-time cocktail classic by pairing their copper-pot distilled tipple with honey (their own “uncooked” Preseli Hills Honey) and the classic orange oils, bitters, and garnish.

‘It’s far a tad arguable,’ admits co-founder Phil Wheeler, who in conjunction with wife Jennifer began generating the gin this summer season after 18 months of painstaking studies, trial, and blunders ‘but from time to time traitions are there to be stirred up a touch. just lightly, no need to shake it!’

Despite its nascent status, Golden Street Gin has already secured an awesome flavor Award and exhibited the specialty and nice meals honesty.

It is called after the historic “Golden Road” course which dates back a few five,000 years and is now a properly-trodden, 7-mile moorland path for ramblers and fanatics of the top-notch outside and lies a stone’s throw from the distillery in Pembrokeshire.

Here’s the recipe, as devised by Phil and Jen in a moment of shameless riot:

Golden Avenue Gin – 60ml

Preseli Hills Honey – 1 Barspoon

Angostura Bitters – 2 Dashes

Orange Bitters – 1 dash

Orange Oils

Orange Twist Garnish

‘Area the substances (except the garnish) right into a jug or something comparable, you simply need to make sure you have got enough room to offer everything a great stir,’ advised Jennifer.

‘Upload ice and stir till cool, then sieve into a pitcher and serve with a garnish of an orange twist.’

If this zesty gin cocktail sounds “ap-peeling” to you, go to Phil and Jen’s online store where you can search out a 70cl bottle of Golden Road Gin and a 251g jar of natural, uncooked honey courtesy of the bees buzzing across the couple’s farm in rural Pembrokeshire.

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